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How C++ Evolved


As object-oriented analysis, design, and programming began to catch on, Bjarne
Stroustrup took the most popular language for commercial software development, C, and extended it to provide the features needed to facilitate object-oriented programming. He created C++, and in less than a decade it has gone from being used by only a handful of developers at AT&T to being the programming language of choice for an estimated one million developers worldwide. It is expected that by the end of the decade, C++ will be the predominant language for commercial software development.

While it is true that C++ is a superset of C, and that virtually any legal C program is a legal C++ program, the leap from C to C++ is very significant. C++ benefited from its relationship to C for many years, as C programmers could ease into their use of C++. To really get the full benefit of C++, however, many programmers found they had to unlearn much of what they knew and learn a whole new way of conceptualizing and solving programming problems.

The ANSI Standard

The Accredited Standards Committee, operating under the procedures of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), is working to create an international standard for C++.
The draft of this standard has been published, and a link is available at www.libertyassociates.com.

The ANSI standard is an attempt to ensure that C++ is portable--that code you write for Microsoft's compiler will compile without errors, using a compiler from any other vendor. Further, because the code in this book is ANSI compliant, it should compile without errors on a Mac, a Windows box, or an Alpha.
For most students of C++, the ANSI standard will be invisible. The standard has been stable for a while, and all the major manufacturers support the ANSI standard. We have endeavored to ensure that all the code in this edition of this book is ANSI compliant.
How C++ Evolved Reviewed by 1000sourcecodes on 09:05 Rating: 5
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